I Welcome the Day

by DC

Plato paints the picture of a Charioteer (Greek: ἡνίοχος) driving a chariot pulled by two winged horses: “First the charioteer of the human soul drives a pair, and secondly one of the horses is noble and of noble breed, but the other quite the opposite in breed and character. Therefore in our case the driving is necessarily difficult and troublesome.” The Charioteer represents intellect, reason, or the part of the soul that must guide the soul to truth; one horse represents rational or moral impulse or the positive part of passionate nature (e.g., righteous indignation); while the other represents the soul’s irrational passions, appetites, or concupiscent nature. The Charioteer directs the entire chariot/soul, trying to stop the horses from going different ways, and to proceed towards enlightenment.

 

 

 

I welcome the day that takes me out of my head.

Not the kind of experience that makes you blur, distort or alter your reality by way of inducing some chemical agent.  No drugs or alcohol will change anything after the effect wares off.  Usually change comes when you meditate or study and if you’re lucky, after years of this process you begin to realize that we go through stages in life that help direct us if we pay attention to the right voices.  In every age, (childhood, adolescence, early adulthood, adulthood, etc>) we have an opportunity to learn what this age can teach us.  In our experiences of the world and in our relationships, what is expected from us; by us, by others, and by the world in general, we can disassociate from the ineffective experiences and learn truths that become known through experience.  But we must also train ourselves to acquire the right knowledge.  The reason part can be faulty and fail to give us truth if we inaccurately perceive or make false deductions.  We should by education selectively seek answers that are sound logically as well as appeal to the other directing components that we rely upon to help us judge.

 

Rabindranath Tagore

“A mind all logic is like a knife all blade. It makes the hand bleed that uses it.”
Rabindranath Tagore
Albert Camus

“It is always easy to be logical. It is almost impossible to be logical to the bitter end.”
Albert Camus
Ryszard Kapuściński

“if reason ruled the world would history even exist?”
Ryszard Kapuściński
René Descartes

“Dubium sapientiae initium. (Doubt is the origin of wisdom.)”
René Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy

 

I welcome the day that takes me out of my heart.

I realize that any of our meaningful experiences often include a layering and overlapping of happy moments upon hurtful moments.  The spectrum of the heart can be wondrous as well as overwhelmingly pernicious.  One must ideally recognize that these moments should balance out and augment our perspectives since the happy as well as the sad times are essential for a healthy experience of the world.   This emotional part should also rely upon other sources to help judge.  Heartfelt moments should have some basis for the mind to intercede before any judgement is rendered.

 

 

Mahatma Gandhi

“Prayer is not asking. It is a longing of the soul. It is daily admission of one’s weakness. It is better in prayer to have a heart without words than words without a heart.”
Mahatma Gandhi
Rumi

“Goodbyes are only for those who love with their eyes. Because for those who love with heart and soul there is no such thing as separation.”
Rumi
C.S. Lewis

“The human heart is not unchanging (nay, changes almost out of recognition in the twinkling of an eye)…”
C.S. Lewis
Fyodor Dostoyevsky

“For though your mind is active enough, your heart is darkened with corruption, and without a pure heart there can be no full or genuine sensibility.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Notes from Underground

 

I welcome the day that takes me out of my sensual appetence.

From the time I was in my twenties, my hunger for physical stimulation often exceeded my emotional need in connections to others and the rational need for understanding from others.  My education about the significance of tactile stimulation began with Ashley Montagu’s book Touching: The Human Significance of the Skin first published in 1971.  I discovered a re-issued publication around 1983 when I was a psychology student on a mission to unlock the mysterious of the mind.

 

Not much later I discovered partly by personal experience and partly by the influences in my education that if you do not blend these stimulative elements, (the head, the heart, and the spirit) of the human being, you can become lost in any one part that can distort your perceptions.  Allowing any of these elements can cause us loss or injury as we are not using the other parts of our being to make good decisions.

 

George Bernard Shaw

“There are two tragedies in life. One is to lose your heart’s desire. The other is to gain it.”
George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman
Friedrich Nietzsche

“Ultimately, it is the desire, not the desired, that we love.”
Friedrich Nietzsche

Abraham Maslow

“It isn’t normal to know what we want. It is a rare and difficult psychological achievement.”
Abraham Maslow
Jean de La Fontaine

“Everyone believes very easily whatever he fears or desires.”
Jean de La Fontaine

In all accounts it is darkness, that teaches us the beauty of light.

In my lifetime on this planet I much like others, had to figure out who I was, who I wanted to be, and how would I get there?   Because of my odyssey and passage in this life, I sought to find answers that would explain questions I did not ascertain from those in my family growing up as a child.  Little did I know then that it would be a lifelong journey.

 ☀︎☀︎☀︎

 

to be continued….

 

 

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